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government. host: can you take us through the next 48 hours on this debate on the fiscal cliff? what needs to happen? caller: ok. i say, the president should be willing to come up to $300,000, as far as tax increases. we need revenue. $400,000, some people make that. we need revenue. the only way to get it is to get it from people who actually have the money. there is no shame in helping our government. this is our government. the republicans need to understand that social security and medicare -- listen, those are so important. people are talking about i do not want children paying the bill. they will need social security as well. i want republicans to realize that they were elected to do the will of the people. not just the three% or whatever. they all need to understand that we are all affected by their thinking -- the president won the election, right? host: thank you for the call. i want to take you through some of the effects, if we do go off the fiscal cliff, if congress takes no action. this is the chart from the new york times of what will happen immediately and in the next couple
. the president said he is modestly optimistic about a fiscal cliff deal getting done before new year's eve. >> clayton: they all said the same thing. presidential meeting with the leaders yesterday. harry reid. >> juliet: vice president showed up. >> clayton: they must have been all on the same table hey whether we lee this table we will say modestly optimistic. listen to senator mitch mcconnell who may be the linchpin of this whole thing. he said i will take the ball and run with it in the senate. get a deal done. listen to the senator. >> we had a good meeting at the white house. we are engaged in discussions the majority leader and myself and the white house in the hopes that we can come forward sunday and have a recommendation that i can make to my conference and the majority leader can make to his conference. we will be working hard to see if we can get there in the next 24 hours. so i'm hopeful and optimistic. >> charles krauthammer calling him a master negotiator. saying if it were left up to him he could solve the syrian civil war in a weekend. >> dave: he can get it done but there
that they are getting something done, the fiscal cliff meeting at the white house right now. what were the mechanics of rushing the deal through congress and getting it passed into law? what would that look like in four days? lisa desjardins joins us now. what will it look like? >> well, there is a couple of possibilities, don. one is that they take sort of the remnants of one of the bills that passed the house or the senate and they just change it. they add whatever is in this deal to it. they have a whole bunch of vehicles that are possible for that. one sticking point, because this deal would most likely deal with taxes, there is a rule in the constitution that is has been interpreted by most every side to determine it has to begin in the house, revenue measures begin in the house. they need a bill that starts in the house, okay, they have a lot to do that. then the trick is making sure they have the votes. i think if we see anything come out of tonight's meeting, anything substantial, that's what is going to happen this next day and a half. leaders on both sides have to make sure they have got t
of the issues the parties said they were concerned about leading into the fiscal cliff. the payroll tax cut is going to expire. no one is talking about extending that. that is the one that gives the biggest bang for the buck. host: if a deal does get done, how much of the cliff aristo going to be staring at? guest: you are staring at one cliff, the payroll tax cut going away. that is 3% of every wage earner up to $100,000 or so. that will have a big economic impact. you are approaching the debt ceiling cliff which will be another standoff. i assume that is where we will get into the discussion of spending cuts that seems to be absent from whatever deal they are talking about. guest: if there is no deal, the full tax cuts go away. the tax increases and spending cuts will go into effect. about iran fiscal policy given the time. but something in between. maybe the minimum of $200 billion and the maximum of $600 billion. host: some statistics with several charts on how it affects you in your income bracket. the richest 20% with scene increase of about $20,000 increase in taxes owed. for those m
-called fiscal cliff and now has to live by it over the next several hours to see if something can get done. erica? >> kelly o'donnell, thank you. chuck todd is nbc's political director. kelly mentioned some constructive movement but then there's this chasm we keep hearing about. is there a chance for a deal? >> i think -- i want to say yes, there's a chance for a deal! they're not that far apart. it really depends on the political motivations of the people at the negotiating table. you think about joe biden and mitch mcconnell, mitch mcconnell is totally looking at this through a political lens, what is in the best interest of republicans in his view? from what i understand in his view he thinks what's in the best interest of the republican party is getting the tax issue off the table and then having a big knockdown, drag-down fight with the president in six weeks over the debt ceiling. under that scenario, that would tell me, okay, he's likely to want to make a deal. when you look at the actions that republicans threw out that idea of throwing in the social security change and suddenly de
, after i hope and pray we adopt the result of the negotiations going on now and avoid the fiscal cliff, we'll still be one grand bargain, budget deal away from restoring our -- our global preeminence. that work has to be done. but at least we will have avoided the cliff. mr. president, by a twist of fate, the occupant of the chair is my colleague and friend, the senator from connecticut, so like -- you've probably seen these numbers, but just to bring it home in one state, what will be the impact if we go over -- if we allow the country to go over the fiscal cliff. in connecticut, 1.4 million middle-class families will see their federal income taxes increase. almost a million and a half families. if the middle-class tax cuts are allowed to expire on january 1, a median-income connecticut family -- now, i know this -- the median in connecticut is higher than it is in most other states, but this number's true for any family making this amount of money, it makes an important point. a family of four earning $86,000 a year happens to be the immediatmedianfamily income in , but that family,
at 7:40 as the nation watches to see what happens with the fiscal cliff, there's another important piece of legislation that needs attention. if nothing is done about it, the cost of milk could go sky high. here's nbc's stephanie gosk. >> reporter: the dairy industry is calling it the milk cliff. just like tax rates, if congress doesn't approve a farm bill by january 1st, the price of milk could go up. way up. right now an average gallon costs $3.65. it could soar to between $6 and $8. mara has three little kids. that means a lot of milk. >> you have to have it for young kids. it helps them grow. so it's hard when it gets that expensive. >> reporter: for many families, milk is a staple they can't cut back on. >> a lot of families that are tight, incomewise, they don't want to buy milk at $7, $8. >> reporter: it's not just milk prices. all dairy products would be affected. imagine if wisconsin cheddar cost more than imported french brie. what would that mean for the average grilled cheese? one part of the complicated farm bill controls the dairy market. without it, pricing would go
in this instance with the fiscal cliff, the consumer discretionaries. the restaurant stocks have done well. the retailers have done well. they could easily re-rate, in other words, correct, partly because consumers could rein in, and we could be seeing that now, we may not, or partly because wall street fears they would rein in. can you see consumer discretion as being vulnerable at this position now? >> consumer discretionary has been the best performing sector since the market bottomed in 2009. if there is a sector that could be in line for a re-writing, as you say, that's probably it. i think the most prudent way to look at the market today is to focus on sectors that have good dividend yields, good valuation and potential for revenue growth. health care and technology both fit that particular area. and i think those are the areas that, from a prudent perspective, might be the best place to make your bets for 2013. >> charles, where would you begin the new year? i know you're looking at value tech names, leapfrogging off of what david just said. you make the point that dell -- i'm using
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)